The Last 500 Rescues: Just The Numbers - Fire Engineering: Firefighter Training and Fire Service News, Rescue (2022)

By Nick Ledin

The goal of Firefighter Rescue Survey (FirefighterRescueSurvey.com or check us out on Facebook) is to gather as much information as possible from actual rescues in the hopes of making us all more effective and efficient on our firegrounds. By collecting data from firefighters who have been in the exact situation that most of us spend a career preparing for, we hope to provide firefighters from around the globe a better chance to save a life. These data are from the first 500 rescues since the survey was expanded and updated (rescues 892 – 1391). The data below differs from the previous posted data in that they either from new questions, new answers, or from new analysis.

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Before we get started though, hereare a couple of rules for interpreting these data:

  • Weneed to understand the entire context as any one specific data set is limitedand has qualifications.
  • We have been, and will continue to fine-tune thesurvey questions and answers in an attempt to make these data as accurate,well-defined, objective, and digestible as possible.
  • Correlationdoes not always equal causation.
  • Wecan’t always get an β€˜ought’ from an β€˜is’.
  • Moreanalysis is always needed.
  • Take this data, and make it work for yourdepartment and your citizens.
  • Lastly,if you have removed a civilian from a fire, please fill out a survey for eachrescue at FirefighterRescueSurvey.com.

Were There Reports of a Victim v TotalRecorded Rescues:

Total Report of Vics – 68% (342/500)

No Report at All – 11% (57/500)

No Report of Vics – 18% (89/500)

Report of Everyone is Out – 2% (12/500)

* Report of Everyoneis Out (by Building Resident – 8)

Were There Reports of a Victim v SurvivalRate:

Total Report of Vics – 62% (210/340)

No Report at All – 68% (39/57)

No Report of Vics – 61% (54/89)

Report of Everyone is Out – 67% (8/12)

* Report of Everyoneis Out (by Building Resident – 75% [6/8])

Who Made the Statement About Victims Insidev Total Recorded Rescues:

Resident of FireBuilding – 52% (178/342)

Police – 7% (24/342)

Neighbor – 23% (79/342)

Bystander – 7% (25/342)

Unknown/Other – 11% (36/342)

Who Made the Statement About Victims Insidev Survival Rate:

Resident of fire building – 66%(116/177)

Police – 79% (19/24)

Neighbor – 43% (34/79)

Bystander – 56% (14/25)

Unknown/Other – 77% (27/35)

FireLocation (Room) v Total Recorded Rescues:

Bedroom – 21% (104/497)

Bathroom – 1% (4/497)

Kitchen – 23% (112/497)

Family Room – 18% (88/497)

Garage – 2% (12/497)

Attic – 2% (10/497)

Exterior – 2% (8/497)

Multiple Rooms – 32% (159/497)

FireLocation (Room) v Survival Rate:

Bedroom – 64% (67/104)

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Bathroom – 75% (3/4)

Kitchen – 72% (80/111)

Family Room – 64% (56/88)

Garage – 75% (9/12)

Attic – 70% (7/10)

Exterior – 88% (7/8)

Multiple Rooms – 51% (80/158)

InitialMode of Operation v Total Recorded Rescues:

Offensive – 92% (449/488)

Defensive – 8% (39/488)

InitialMode of Operation v Survival Rate:

Offensive – 65% (291/449)

Defensive – 38% (15/39)

Conditionsat Victim Location v Total Recorded Rescues:

Fire – 3% (13/495)

Fire and Smoke – 25% (125/495)

Smoke – 69% (343/495)

No Fire or Smoke – 3% (14/495)

Conditionsat Victim Location v Survival Rate:

Fire – 15% (2/13)

Fire and Smoke – 40% (50/124)

Smoke – 71% (245/343)

No Fire or Smoke – 79% (11/14)

Didthe Structure Appear Vacant or Abandoned v Total Recorded Rescues:

Yes – 4% (21/500)

No – 96% (479/500)

Didthe Structure Appear Vacant or Abandoned v Survival Rate:

Yes – 60% (12/20)

No – 63% (299/478)

Didthe Structure Have Working Smoke Alarms v Total Recorded Rescues:

Yes – 38% (190/499)

No – 30% (152/499)

Unknown – 31% (157/499)

Didthe structure have working smoke alarms v Survival Rate:

Yes – 76% (144/189)

No – 56% (85/152)

Unknown – 53% (83/157)

Wasthe Victim Found Behind a Closed Door/Isolated From Fire v Total RecordedRescues:

Yes – 20% (100/498)

No – 80% (398/498)

Wasthe Victim Found Behind a Closed Door/Isolated From Fire v Survival Rate:

Yes – 84% (84/100)

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No – 57% (228/397)

Locationof Victim (Within Compartment) v Total Recorded Rescues:

On Floor Within 6β€² of an Exterior Door– 14% (69/501)

On Floor Directly Beneath a Window – 8%(41/501)

Closet – 1% (7/501)

In Crib – 1% (4/501)

On Bed – 13% (67/501)

Under Bed – 1% (5/501)

Couch/Sofa/Chair – 4% (22/501)

Floor – 38% (191/501)

Standing – 11% (53/501)

Bath Tub/Shower – 2% (8/501)

Other – 7% (34/501)

* All Floor Categories(Non-Bed/Crib/Chair/Standing/Other) – 71% (355/501)

Locationof Victim (Within Compartment) v Survival Rate:

On Floor Within 6β€² of an Exterior Door– 46% (32/69)

On Floor Directly Beneath a Window – 66%(27/41)

Closet – 71% (5/7)

In Crib – 75% (3/4)

On Bed – 56% (37/66)

Under Bed – 60% (3/5)

Couch/Sofa/Chair – 91% (20/22)

Floor – 55% (105/191)

Standing – 96% (51/53)

Bath Tub/Shower – 50% (4/8)

Other – 76% (26/34)

* All Floor Categories(Non-Bed/Crib/Chair/Standing/Other) – 55% (176/321)

DidCrew That Located the Victim Physically Have a Hoseline With Them v TotalRecorded Rescues:

Locatedby Primary Search Crew:

Yes – 9% (25/285)

No – 91% (260/285)

Locatedby All Crews:

Yes – 22% (110/494)

No – 78% (384/494)

DidCrew That Located the Victim Physically Have a Hoseline With Them v SurvivalRate:

Locatedby Primary Search Crew:

Yes – 56% (14/25)

No – 67% (173/260)

Locatedby All Crews:

Yes – 55% (61/110)

No – 65% (249/384)

Numberof Firefighters Assigned to Search Before Victim Was Located v Total RecordedRescues:

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0 – 11% (57/500)

1 – 8% (41/500)

2 – 37% (187/500)

3 – 17% (85/500)

4 – 13% (66/500)

5 – 5% (27/500)

>5 – 7% (37/500)

Numberof Firefighters Assigned to Search Before Victim Was Located v Survival Rate:

0 – 65% (37/57)

1 – 80% (33/41)

2 – 64% (119/187)

3 – 67% (57/85)

4 – 55% (36/66)

5 – 67% (18/27)

>5 – 36% (13/36)

Wasa Thermal Imaging Camera Used to Assist Search v Total Recorded Rescues:

Yes – 36% (179/499)

No – 64% (320/499)

Wasa Thermal Imaging Camera Used to Assist Search v Survival Rate:

Yes – 49% (88/178)

No – 70% (225/320)

Did Victim Exit Under Their Own Power v Total RecordedRescues:

Yes – 16% (78/500)

No – 84% (422/500)

Did Victim Exit Under Their Own Power v Survival Rate:

Yes – 100% (78/78)

No – 56% (235/421)

HowWas Victim Removed v Total Recorded Rescues:

Drag or Carry (Dirty Drag) – 79% (367/463)

Drag of Carry with webbing (or similar)– 6% (26/463)

Ground Ladder – 14% (64/463)

Aerial Ladder – 1% (6/463)

HowWas Victim Removed v Survival Rate:

Drag or Carry (Dirty Drag) – 59%(215/367)

Drag of Carry with webbing (or similar)– 62% (16/26)

Ground Ladder – 87% (55/63)

Aerial Ladder – 100% (6/6)

Pathof Removal v Total Recorded Rescues:

Door – 59% (286/484)

Window – 22% (108/484)

Down or Up interior stairs – 18% (88/484)

Shelter in Place – <1% (2/484)

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Pathof Removal v Survival Rate:

Door – 62% (177/286)

Window – 72% (77/107)

Down or Up interior stairs – 64% (56/88)

Shelter in Place – 0% (0/2)

Wasa Cyanokit Used v Total Recorded Rescues:

Yes – 9% (42/486)

No – 91% (444/486)

Wasa Cyanokit Used v Survival Rate:

Yes – 67% (28/42)

No – 63% (277/443)

WasCPR Performed on Victim v Total Recorded Rescues:

Yes – 31% (155/496)

No – 69% (341/496)

WasCPR Performed on Victim v Survival Rate:

Yes – 32% (49/154)

No – 76% (260/341)

WasVictim Conscious Upon Removal From Structure v Total Recorded Rescues:

Yes – 37% (183/499)

No – 63% (316/499)

WasVictim Conscious Upon Removal From Structure v Survival Rate:

Yes – 97% (178/183)

No – 43% (135/315)

VictimBurns v Total Recorded Rescues:

None – 46% (225/488)

Mild – 27% (133/488)

Severe – 27% (130/488)

VictimBurns v Survival Rate:

None – 80% (180/225)

Mild – 54% (72/133)

Severe – 42% (55/130)

DidVictim Suffer Smoke Inhalation v Total Recorded Rescues:

Yes– 93% (458/492)

No – 7% (34/492)

DidVictim Suffer Smoke Inhalation v Survival Rate:

Yes– 60% (277/458)

No – 91% (31/34)

TotalRecorded Rescues v Survival Rate:

Alive – 63% (313/500)

Deceased – 37% (187/500)

NICK LEDINis a firefighter paramedic with the Eau Claire (WI) Fire Department, assigned to Truck 9/Medic 9. Ledin is a 13-year fire service veteran and is an instructor with Chippewa Valley Technical College and Central Lakes College. He’s a contributor to β€œFirefighter Rescue Survey,” an FDIC International instructor, and the former president of the Northland F.O.O.L.S. He’s a technical committee member for NFPA 1700, was a former technical panel member for UL FSRI’s PPA/PPV study, and was a co-host ofInternational Perspectiveon Fire Engineering Blog Talk Radio. He is an affiliate member of FireNuggets Minnesota/Wisconsin.

FAQs

How many fire services are there in the UK? β€Ί

All fire and rescue services are overseen by fire and rescue authorities (FRAs). There are currently 45 FRAs in England (see map in Appendix A).

How much do firefighters make UK? β€Ί

Our pay and benefits are great
RoleSalary
Trainee FirefighterΒ£28,730
Firefighter (Development)Β£29,880
Firefighter (Competent)Β£38,340 - Β£39,325
Leading FirefighterΒ£41,842 - Β£42,829
4 more rows

Who owns Fire Service College? β€Ί

Acquisition by Capita in March 2013 saw the College move from the Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG) to Capita ownership.

What are the ranks in the fire service UK? β€Ί

Career Progression
  • Crew Manager. In charge of the crew of a fire appliance. ...
  • Watch Manager. In charge of the watch at fire stations. ...
  • Station Manager. ...
  • Group Manager. ...
  • Area Manager. ...
  • Assistant Chief Fire Officer. ...
  • Deputy Chief Fire Officer. ...
  • Chief Fire Officer.

What is the largest fire service in the world? β€Ί

The Tokyo Fire Department (TFD) (Japanese: 東京梈防庁, Tokyo Shōbōchō) is a fire department headquartered in Ōtemachi, Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan. The TFD was formed on March 7, 1948, and is responsible for protecting the Tokyo Metropolis Area. The Fire Department is the largest urban fire department in the world.

What is the busiest fire station in England? β€Ί

Who are we? London Fire Brigade is the busiest fire and rescue service in the country.

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